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Fostering Hope

What Can I Do to Help? Part 3: Adopt!

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Dec 27, 2013 by fosteringhope

As we enter a new year, you may be thinking more than ever about the question, “What can I do to help a child in foster care?” Our first suggestion was to commit to regularly pray for the entire foster care community, including, of course, the actual children in care. Read more about prayer here and here. Our second suggestion was to consider the possibility of becoming a foster care provider. Read a bit more about that here, here, and here.

The first goal for a child in foster care is to reunite him with his biological caregiver. Unfortunately, this does not always occur. All too often, the biological parents are unable to overcome the issues which led to the removal of their children. In those cases, parental rights are terminated. What does this mean for the children? They immediately enter into an even higher risk statistical pool than when they were “simply” in foster care. These children now need families willing to make a permanent commitment to them through adoption.

Currently, approximately 100,000 children in foster care are considered adoptable. They will not return to their biological parents. If these children are not adopted, they face the grim prospects of aging out of the system having never achieved permanency. You can read a bit about that here.

While 100,000 children may seem like a lot, the good news is that it is a paltry number in comparison with the number of professing Christians in our country. The church community could easily meet this need if just a fraction of professing Christians would adopt. Read more about adopting here.

If you would like to know more details about adopting a child through care, please contact us. We would love to speak with you or even connect you with one of our regional “mentors” who can give you a first-hand perspective.

As we say on our website, “The path of adoption is filled with joy and sorrow; highs and lows; victories and defeats-but through it, the legacy of a child can be transformed forever.”

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